A woman walks through a landfill, surveying the amount of litter that has accumulated there. Source: The eco guide to disposing of litter | Ethical and green living | The Guardian

“The trash and litter of nature disappears into the ground with the passing of each year, but man’s litter has more permanence.” — John Steinbeck

We’ve all seen it when we pass through in our cars or when walking through the woods for some much needed repose. It makes us nauseous, overwhelmed, and completely heartbroken to see such beautiful landscapes completely covered in trash (well, at least for those of us who don’t try to make them that way). Of course, we’ve all been guilty of having had some blow off from our vehicles without knowing or not taking the…


If there’s anything that the Coronavirus pandemic has taught people, everyone could agree how it has helped us cherish the precious time we have on Earth and just simply being alive. For others, this goes further by instilling in them a greater appreciation for the natural world. That’s exactly what happened with me.

I still remember clearly when the Coronavirus pandemic was in its nascent stages, the news flooding in from Wuhan that shook the world with details of flu-like symptoms, the immediate lockdowns, and death tolls that no one had anticipated. However, from the perspective of the United States…


As the world fights Coronavirus, it feels as if climate change is being completely forgotten. This was supposed to be a year of action to accompany one prodigious decade, but plans have changed…again.

Here we are, more than six months into 2020, still grappling with Coronavirus (of course, countries like the U.S. are waist deep in it), so anyone with enough common sense can understand how most people’s minds have been preoccupied with the dangers and uncertainty that a pandemic brings. Unfortunately, as there are those who continue to deny and downplay Coronavirus, a still frightening number of people equally…


With over 120,000 Americans dead, almost 2,500,000 confirmed cases, unemployment resembling the likes of the Great Depression, and common sense being thrown out the window, how much more can we take?

When I first learned about the newly emerged sars-cov-2 from Wuhan late last year, scrolling through my news feed in bed one night, I was alarmed but felt like the Chinese would be able to contain it in time. China is one of the most educated and innovative countries in the entire world, so I didn’t let my mind become overwhelmed by the breaking news. However, as time went…


When I first arrived in college after four rigorous and very brutal years of high school, I thought that I was prepared for any challenge that came my way. Having graduated with a 4.85 GPA and being looked at by over 300 different schools throughout the nation, everything seemed to be hopeful. However, college would bring its own set of hardships that were, and continue to be, unique. …


For many decades, the delicate topic of climate change was often shoved to the side and placed on the back burner, mostly forgotten about and not granted the importance it deserved. It was one of those issues that could always wait, one that never would require urgency to solve since someone else could take the reigns. Thanks to the influence of non-believers and significant governmental power, warnings were never heeded while little to no progress was made in large periods of time to curve its effects on the world. …


Although climate change is severely affecting our planet in a multitude of ways, including the harm that it inflicts upon biodiversity, the effects of it affect endemic species more significantly than those that are not. Endemic species are only found in a certain part of the world and nowhere else, making them more vulnerable to changes in habitat, disease, human activity, or any stochastic events in general. This is exactly what is happening to Hawaii’s native bird species, especially to the Akikiki, one of the most endangered in the entire state. …


On a beautiful day at the beach, there are lots of people in the water having fun and just as many enjoying the view from the shore. A comfortable breeze keeps everyone cool, the surf is calm and safe, and there are absolutely no worries on such a perfect afternoon. Suddenly, a wave crashes on shore carrying hundreds of dead fish in its wake, spilling them in front of the onlooking beachgoers who, in disgust and horror, order their kids to get out of the water. A crowd gathers, wondering how so many fish could all perish and wash up…


You and your family are on a road trip, and, on the way to your destination, you all pass through a beautiful forest, a place that offers such a nice change of scenery after being on the road for so long. Seeing the magnificent trees, glimpses of the wildlife that reside there, and, escaping to the peaceful realm of the natural world, you hope that your time in the forest will last for a good while before exiting it. But, alas, this sanctuary comes to an end shortly after you entered it, so, the next thing you know, you’re all…


With less than twelve years until we reach the 2030 benchmark to curve the effects of climate change, it’s time that everyone come to grips with this truly terrifying reality. Experts predict that if global efforts can’t reach significant recovery goals by that time, we’ll enter a positive reinforcement pattern where any kind of control will be ultimately out of our reach, leaving us with little to no hope in the future. As many people as there are who either don’t know about climate change or completely refuse to accept the facts even after being shown the evidence, taking action…

Alan Bailey

I’m a graduate from LaGrange College with a B.S. in Biology, striving to be a conservationist and to help our planet.

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